Archives for posts with tag: TCM

TIME magazine has called Tai Chi the “Perfect Exercise.” What’s the big deal, why is it so different from typical exercise and who can benefit from practicing tai chi?

Most of the estimated seven million Americans who practice the ancient art of tai chi do so to increase their health, not for self-defense.

Western medical research studies confirm what hundreds of millions of tai chi practitioners have experienced themselves: tai chi improves health, reduces stress, and mitigates the effects of aging.

Click here to read the full report that includes info on
Tai Chi – Exercise for your health
Chi is Life-Force Energy
Western Health Studies confirm Tai Chi has many beneficial health effects

Before you start make a pot of tea, sit down and relax. Hope it inspires you too!

Thanks to Bruce Frantzis for sharing this wonderful article. Bruce is a Taoist lineage holder in both the Wu and Yang styles of tai chi, as well as bagua, hsing-i and Taoist meditation.

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Serves 6.

Ingredients:
2 onions
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium squash
2 pints vegetable stock
1 cup dried chestnuts,
soaked
2 cloves garlic
1 bayleaf
1 teaspoon rosemary
Splash of cider vinegar
Parsley to garnish
Pinch paprika

Method:
Presoak the chestnuts overnight or use fresh chestnuts if available. Chop the onions roughly and fry in the olive oil until softened. Chop the squash, removing the skin and seeds, and sweat with the onions, turning occasionally until it starts to soften. Add the vegetable stock, chestnuts, crushed garlic, bayleaf and rosemary. Simmer for 40 minutes, remove the bayleaf and liquidise adding a splash of cider vinegar and a good twist of freshly ground black pepper.
Serve garnished with parsley and a sprinkle of paprika.
10 minutes preparation/50 minutes cooking.

Action:
Squash nourishes the Spleen, strengthening the Qi and helping remove Dampness. Chestnuts also support the Spleen as well as warming the Kidney, strengthening Yang and gently stimulating Blood circulation. This recipe is ideal for the condition of Spleen Yang Deficiency.

This recipe has been reproduced from Daverick Leggett and Meridian Press book Helping Ourselves, Click here to read Simon Fielding, European Journal of Oriental Medicine review.

Daverick along with Graeme McCracken also run daily seminars to weekly retreats on the theory and practice of food energetics, Qigong and Meditation, lectures in nutritional theory, tasting and cooking.


Hilly village lanes,
Whitewashed sunlit walls
Cerulean sea.
The laughter of children.

No matter where in the world you go, no matter how many languages are spoken, and no matter how many times cultures and governments clash, the laughter of children is universally uplifting.

The mirth of adults can be variously jealous, insecure, sadistic, cruel, or absurd, but the sound of playing children evokes the ideal of a simple and pure act. There are no concepts, no ideologies – only the innocent pleasure of life.

We as adults dwell upon our grizzled complexities, our existential anxieties, and our preoccupations with responsibilities. We hear the merriment of children and may sigh over our lost childhoods. Although we can no longer fit into our old clothes and become young again, we can take comfort in the optimism of children.

Their rejoicing can gladden us all.

We are too often in a rush for our child is far better for them to fully live each year of their lives. Let them what is appropriate to their time, let them play.
And when their childhood is spent at adolescence, help them in a gentle transition.

Then their laughter will continue to resonate with cheer and hope for us all.

Yintang (M-HN-3)
Hall of Impression

Location
At the glabella, at the midpoint between the medial extremities of the eyebrows. Lying between the eyebrows, in an area ascribed to as the ‘third eye’ by many traditional cultures.

Benefits
Can help with frontal headaches, vertigo, common cold and insomnia.

Laogong P-8
Palace of Toil

Ying spring and Fire point of the Pericardium hand channel

Location
In the middle of the palm, between the middle and the ring fingers, adjacent to the 3rd metacarpal bone. This point may be located at the place where the tip of the middle finger lands when a fist is made

Benefits
This point can help with poor appetite. It can calm someone who is having hysterics

Laogong point