Archives for posts with tag: Health

 

 

Weekend Qigong retreat at the beautiful Beacon Bank Farm which nestles in gently rolling Staffordshire countryside. Secluded from neighbours and busy roads, it feels suspended in an earlier period when time passed more slowly and nature provided the news of the day. It is a wonderful place to stay and unwind, to let go of the hustle and bustle and to just enjoy the simple, natural pace of life with our small community.

The Zhan Zhuang course will be run by Sifu Tony Dove who is a disciple of Master Lam.

Zhan Zhuang Chi Kung:
‘Standing Like A Tree Energy Exercise’.

The term ‘Standing Like A Tree’ was first used by by Master Lam in the 1980’s, when he introduced Zhan Zhuang (pronounced ‘Jam Jong’) to the West. The roots of this fascinating art go back at least 27 centuries.

In practice, you stand and grow just like a tree. With no strain, and developing steadily, you establish strong foundations. On these firm foundations, you grow health and happiness.

The root of the experience is in static postures.  As the body becomes settled, new aspects of the art are added, developing the breadth of the practice.

Zhan Zhuang develops relaxed stability in body and mind.  The Art of Zhan Zhuang is like a fully grown tree, with many branches coming from one root. The different branches of the art include health, medical, martial and meditative applications.

The diversity of branches give shape to the tree, making it naturally balanced, vibrant, abundant, generous,
and strong.

At first, the effects of Zhan Zhuang work inwardly, and are personal.  Later, they become stronger, and are noticeable from the outside.  This is much like a tree grown from a seed, small at first, yet finally providing shelter and sustenance to huge variety of life.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hilly village lanes,
Whitewashed sunlit walls
Cerulean sea.
The laughter of children.

No matter where in the world you go, no matter how many languages are spoken, and no matter how many times cultures and governments clash, the laughter of children is universally uplifting.

The mirth of adults can be variously jealous, insecure, sadistic, cruel, or absurd, but the sound of playing children evokes the ideal of a simple and pure act. There are no concepts, no ideologies – only the innocent pleasure of life.

We as adults dwell upon our grizzled complexities, our existential anxieties, and our preoccupations with responsibilities. We hear the merriment of children and may sigh over our lost childhoods. Although we can no longer fit into our old clothes and become young again, we can take comfort in the optimism of children.

Their rejoicing can gladden us all.

We are too often in a rush for our child is far better for them to fully live each year of their lives. Let them what is appropriate to their time, let them play.
And when their childhood is spent at adolescence, help them in a gentle transition.

Then their laughter will continue to resonate with cheer and hope for us all.

Yintang (M-HN-3)
Hall of Impression

Location
At the glabella, at the midpoint between the medial extremities of the eyebrows. Lying between the eyebrows, in an area ascribed to as the ‘third eye’ by many traditional cultures.

Benefits
Can help with frontal headaches, vertigo, common cold and insomnia.

Fire cools.
Water seeks its own level.

No matter how extreme a situation is, it will change. It cannot continue forever. Thus, a great forest fire is always destined to burn itself out; a turbulent sea will become calmer. Natural events balance themselves out by seeking their opposites, and this process of balance is at the heart of all healing.

This process takes time. If an event is not great, the balancing required is slight. If it is momentous, then it may take days, years, even lifetimes for things to return to an even keel.

Actually, without these slight imbalances, there could be no movement in life. It is being off balance that keeps life changing. Total centering, total balance would only be stasis.

All life is continual destruction and healing, over and over again. That is why, even in the midst of an extreme situation, the wise are patient. Whether the situation is illness, calamity, or their own anger, they know that healing will follow upheaval.

Deng Ming-Dao

Laogong P-8
Palace of Toil

Ying spring and Fire point of the Pericardium hand channel

Location
In the middle of the palm, between the middle and the ring fingers, adjacent to the 3rd metacarpal bone. This point may be located at the place where the tip of the middle finger lands when a fist is made

Benefits
This point can help with poor appetite. It can calm someone who is having hysterics

Laogong point